Tag Archives: Web Strategy

Social Business Relationships in Enterprise 2.0

Social Business Strategy & Trends

The SOA Social Graph Love Affair

Saint Valentine’s Day is quickly approaching and it has me thinking more about relationships.  Psychology Today published an interesting article on learning what you need to know to make your relationship last.  A relationship can be defined as an association between two or more people that may range from fleeting to enduring. This association may be based on limerence, love, solidarity, regular business interactions, or some other type of social commitment. Interpersonal relationships are formed in the context of social, cultural and other influences. The context can vary from family or kinship relations, friendship, marriage, relations with associates, work, clubs, neighborhoods, and places of worship. They may be regulated by law, custom, or mutual agreement, and are the basis of social groups and society as a whole.  This article will focus on relationships in Enterprise 2.0 Strategy and the Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) Social Graph love affair.  The content of the article will include Social Business trends & predictions, Web 2.0 Technologies, and resources to help users integrate systems through Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) to support relationships between people and data fueling the Social Graph providing context to information for the Enterprise.  This relates to a previous article: Enterprise 2.0 Cloud Computing & Service Oriented Architecture (SOA).

Social Business Forecast: 2011 The Year of Integration

Industry analyst that specializes on customer strategy and  Altimeter Group partner Jeremiah Owyang ( @jowyang ) shares survey information and great insights in this presentation.

Social Business Integration with SOA & WOA

The use of Service-Oriented Architecture leveraging Web-Oriented Architecture (WOA) in Enterprise 2.0 can ease the pain of integration and centralize information management.  This strategy provides the flexibility of sharing information in the proper context while supporting the Social Graph.  Context can be provided by including simple markup in existing solutions.  This markup includes FOAFXFN, and Microformats for events & profiles.  The internet provides many great examples of Web 2.0 Technology integrating SOA and WOA.  Gravatar and DISQUS are two quick examples.  Gravatar provides people a Globally Recognized Avatar that software developers can include through a very simple Application Programming Interface (API) supported by WOA.  DISQUS is a comments platform that helps you build an active community from your website’s audience. It has awesome features, powerful tools, and it’s easy to install.  A solid Enterprise 2.0 Strategy includes much more that providing collaboration tools to employees and includes supporting relationships between everyone and everything connected to the Business.

Social Graph Based Business Models

The audio in this video is low, but there are many great topics covered here.  These topics include “The Super Connector”, “Activity Streams”, “Network Effects”, “Social Graph”, “Facebook”, “Micro Transactions”, and more.  This Social Graph Based Business Models video can be viewed here.

Introduction to the Social Graph API

Google engineer Brad Fitzpatrick gives an introduction to the Social Graph API. The Social Graph API makes information about the public connections between people more easily available. Developers can query this public information to offer their users dramatically streamlined “add friends” functionality and other useful features.  A quick overview of the Social Graph API is available in this video.


Supporting the Social Graph with SocialSite

Understand the importance of Social Networking features in Web applications. Learn about the new OpenSocial standard for plugging into Social Networks. See how Project SocialSite’s Web Services and Widgets make it easy to make your Web Applications social.  Learn more here.

Google’s OpenSocial

Applications that use the OpenSocial APIs can be embedded within a social network itself, or access a site’s social data from anywhere on the internet or intranet.  Learn more here.

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Enterprise OpenSocial Whitepaper: Enterprises are collections of people, and thus inherently social. Employees of any organization benefit from social connections, group affiliations and relationships both within their own business and between other businesses. As a result, social networking capabilities have become increasingly popular in business-to-consumer, business-to-business, and internal enterprise collaboration applications. New technologies and standards such as Web 2.0 and OpenSocial [1] are helping software providers better model relationships between people, allowing end-users to benefit from such relationships in day-to-day business processes within their own enterprise, and across business networks. Google’s Enterprise OpenSocial Whitepaper is available here.

Web 2.0 and the Enterprise: A Symbiotic Relationship

Time shifting & place shifting We then discovered that the same type of time shifting happening among consumers was taking place in the workplace too. People were switching between tasks, collaborating and consuming media in completely new ways. Lean more here.

Happy Fav Five Friday!

Fav 5 Places

The Architecture of SocialSite

A quick presentation on the architecture of SocialSite, Sun’s implementation of a OpenSocial compliant Social Networking site using Shindig.  Learn more about SocialSite architecture here. (SocialSite is a Glassfish project now known as “SocialFish“)

Enterprise 2.0 Activity Streams

Activity streams will continue to be a much hyped capability within social platforms. However resulting “stream glut”, interoperability, and security-related issues will threaten benefits unless better user experience design, filtering, standardization, permission models, and back-end analytics are applied. Learn more here.

Social Media is from Mars, Enterprise 2.0 is from Venus

Focus on creating and maintaining genuine relationships with customers.  Learn more here.

The relationship between Enterprise 2.0 and Web 2.0

A topic that is closely related to Enterprise 2.0 is Web 2.0. It is important to note, however, that the concepts are not one and the same, but rather they are two individual areas that are built on top of similar foundations. The term Web 2.0 describes the shift in focus from static and singular media to dynamic, interactive community-oriented social media. Learn more here.

Web 3.0 and Social Business: 2011 Predictions & Recommendations

2011 will mark a turning point in the adoption of digital social technologies because the experimentation phase is drawing to a close, and stakeholder expectations are increasing. Organizations and people will no longer gain attention by executing badly. At the enterprise level, participation will wane in venues and initiatives that have no business strategy, focus, content strategy and commitment.  Learn more here.

Summary

The future of intranets and the internet is all about context, integration, app stores, apps, mashups, widgets, gadgets, and filters.  Integrating Web-Oriented Architecture (WOA) in Enterprise 2.0 supporting Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) will improve Business success.

Enterprise 2.0 App Stores: When Good Web 2.0 Apps Go Bad

Custom Dashboards in the Enterprise & Web 2.0 Apps

There’s an app for that!

The success of Apple’s iPhone App Store, Mac apps, and Google’s Marketplace all play a part in driving the trend of Enterprise 2.0 App Stores in business organizations of all sizes.  The idea of providing a solution with “There’s an app for that!” will be common place in the near future.  The App Store market will get very interesting when organizations and Government Agencies harness the true power of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) & Cloud Computing.  This trend will help fuel the Federated System.  More information about Enterprise 2.0 App Store Architecture can be found here The 80-20 Rule for Web 2.0 Architecture in the Enterprise.

Where Do Apps Come From?

Custom Enterprise 2.0 Dashboards can include apps, widgets, and gadgets that include resources that are internal, external, and a combination of both.

  1. Internal Resources: Apps and their data that are hosted and maintained within the organization. The risk level is low.
  2. Internal and External Resources: There are usually internally created apps that use external data. The risk level is medium.
  3. External Resources: Apps that are hosted by third parties.  The trust relationship is complex and the risk level usually remains high.

How Are Apps Delivered?

Apps are added to devices and dashboards in multiple ways. App code and private data should reside in the client, but this is rarely the case.  Web 2.0 Apps are usually added to Enterprise 2.0 Dashboards by using the following technologies and methods.

What Are Application Security Risks?

Attackers can potentially use many different paths through your application to do harm to your business or organization. Each of these paths represents a risk that may, or may not, be serious enough to warrant attention.  The top 10 application security risks of 2010 can be reviewed on the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) web site here.  Additional Web Security information is available from the Open Ajax alliance at Ajax and Mashup Security.  The main rule of thumb is, “Never trust external data”.  Using a Proxy Server to fetch external data can help support the additional security requirements.  A proxy server is also helpful in capturing metrics of external resource usage.  The proxy server can integrated like an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) to support the complex structure of Enterprise 2.0 App Stores.

What Happens When Good Web 2.0 Apps Go Bad?

How to Detect a Key Logger on Your System

Most people in the Web 2.0 World are familiar with the acronym WYSIWYG, “What You See is What You Get”.  This new acronym WYRIWYR, “What You Requested is What You Received” will be covered here.  The consumer and the producer should be focused on WYRIWYR.  Producers need to trust the consumer’s identity and consumers need to feel secure.

Data can be tampered with on either end and while in transit.

The Open Source Software Community frequently uses checksum to protect software integrity. This same strategy can be used to protect consumers from malicious apps and widgets.  This simplified example will use MD5 in PHP to check the integerity of the app, but MD5 should not be used for sensitive data like passwords in a production environment.  US-CERT of the U. S. Department of Homeland Security said MD5 “should be considered cryptographically broken and unsuitable for further use,” and most U.S. government applications will be required to move to the SHA-2 family of hash functions after 2010.

Simple App

Here is a very simple app that could be part of a custom Enterprise 2.0 Dashboard. The App is reviewed and approved. The reviewer signs the app (creates app MD5 Hash: c15a7308d89afe9218a1b0f60a37f8ad) so changes can be detected when it comes back through the proxy server.

Simple App in Proxy Server before Dashboard Display
Deliver app if new hash and signature match. Disable app and notify Admin if something does not look right.

The Simple App with Key Logger Script Injected

Happy Fav Five Friday!

Fav 5 Places

  1. Google Gadgets For Your Webpage
  2. ‘App store’ makes service orientation real for the business
  3. Global CIO: The Case For Copying Apple’s App Store
  4. Nexuo Enterprise Platform
  5. Enterprise Irregulars: Designing User Experience

The people from Open Social provides a great Introduction To Signed Requests

OpenSocial API provides a method to communicate OpenSocial ID numbers back to your server in a secure way, allowing for the construction of robust web service backed OpenSocial applications, using a portion of the OAuth authorization protocol.  This article will explain the method to make such secure requests from your OpenSocial applications, as well as the server-side process that you need to follow in order to verify that the data passed has not been tampered with.   Learn more here.

Web 2.0 Summit: The Future Strategy of Web Technologies

Web 2.0 Summit: Points of Control

More than any time in the history of the Web, incumbents in the network economy are consolidating their power and staking new claims to key points of control.  The Web 2.0 Summit, hosted by John Battelle ( @johnbattelle ) and Tim O’Reilly ( @timoreilly ) was packed with brilliant thoughts from intelligent leaders in the web / business space.  New business innovators from Google, Twitter, Facebook, Baidu, and many other properties in the global web space eagerly shared their current insights and ideas about the future.  This year’s theme was about Points of Control, as you can see in this interactive Points of Contorl Map.  You can learn more about this map here.  Thanks to O’Reilly Meida for another great event.

Web 2.0 Summit: Points of Control

Five Key Strategies From The Web 2.0 Summit

  1. Go Social/Mobile or Become Irrelevant
  2. Build A Diverse Empire, Measure, Refine
  3. Learn Everything You Can About Social Behavior
  4. Share Value of Collective Intelligence
  5. Focus on User Experience

Fav Five Web 2.0 Summit Videos

Web 2.0 Summit (formerly named Web 2.0 Conference) brings the intelligence, innovation, and leadership of the Internet industry together in one place at one time. Through incisive plenary sessions, frank onstage conversations, rapid-fire “high order bits,” and Launch Pad, visionaries and executives from across the Internet economy present their unique perspective on the Web’s future. Web 2.0 Summit is brought to you in partnership with O’Reilly Media, Inc. and TechWeb and moderated by John Battelle, Program Chair, and O’Reilly CEO and founder, Tim O’Reilly in association with Federated Media.  You can see all the Web 2.0 Summit videos here.  I have included five of my favorite videos below.

Web 2.0 Summit 2010: “A Conversation with Google’s Eric Schmidt”

Watch the conversation with Google’s Erick Schmidt video here.

Web 2.0 Summit 2010: “A Conversation with Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg”

Watch this conversation with Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg video here.

Web 2.0 Summit 2010: “A Conversation with Twitter’s Evan Williams”

Watch this conversation with Twitter’s Evan Williams video here.

Web 2.0 Summit 2010: Mary Meeker on “Internet Trends”

Watch this “Internet Trends” presentation by Mary Meeker video here.

Web 2.0 Summit 2010: Zynga’s Mark Pincus on “Playing for High Stakes in the New App Economy”

Watch this Social Gaming presentation by Zynga’s Mark Pincus here.

Fav Five Places

  1. Live Blogging Baidu CEO Robin Li At Web 2.0 Summit
  2. The TechCrunch Guide to the Web 2.0 Summit
  3. Google CEO: Android update “could replace credit cards”
  4. Web 2.0 Summit November 15-17 San Francsico, Part 6–Mark Zuckerberg Keynote Interview
  5. Web 2.0 Summit focuses on mapping Net economy’s ‘points of control’

Web 2.0 Expo: The Future of the Web, A Platform Strategy

You can learn how to use persuasive design to encourage positive user behavior and more from these Web 2.0 Expo videos here.

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Fav Five Faces

Who is on your “Fantasy Innovation Team” this week?

Here are amazing people that have connected me to new friends and new ideas this week. You might be familiar with “Fantasy Football Teams” , well this is my “Fantasy Innovation Team” this week. I recommend following these smart, creative people on Twitter.

timoreilly-twitter Founder and CEO, O’Reilly Media. Watching the alpha geeks, sharing their stories, helping the future unfold. http://twitter.com/timoreilly
johnbattelle-twitter Media, Technology, Culture, Business http://twitter.com/johnbattelle
ev-twitter Farm boy from Nebraska. Husband and father. Co-founder of Twitter. http://twitter.com/ev
ericschmidt-twitter CEO Google http://twitter.com/ericschmidt
timberners_lee-twitter Director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) w3.org, the place to agree on web standards. Founded new webfoundation.org – let the web serve humanity http://twitter.com/timberners_lee

Game Theory for Enterprise 2.0 Adoption

How to apply game theory to Enterprise 2.0

In John Hopson’s article Behavioral Game Design he shares the basic ways people react to different patterns of rewards.  He ends the article with this:  “Each contingency is an arrangement of time, activity, and reward, and there are an infinite number of ways these elements can be combined to produce the pattern of activity you want from your players.”

Understanding these patterns of rewards along with  Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs (below) and applying them to the design of an Enterprise 2.0 solution can improve success by increasing the adoption rate.  This will also help the organization realize the return on investment (ROI) sooner, than later.  The Organization’s ROI will reflect how well the platform matches users with Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.  These needs can be met in various ways, but let’s take a look at a few easy ways to improve the desired pattern of activity.

Profiles of Members on Enterprise 2.0 Platforms

  • Add a “date field” for the updated date. Display “recently updated profiles” list on the profiles dashboard.  Members update their profile and they are instantly rewarded by being included on this list.
  • Add a “date field for the last viewed date. Display “recently viewed profiles” list on the profiles dashboard.  Members engage others on the platform, which leads to profile views and they are instantly rewarded by being included on this list.  This behavior also leads members to completing profile details.  Members that see their “last viewed date” is old can steps to become more engaged.
  • Add a “int field” to store the count of profile views. Display “most viewed profiles” list on the profiles dashboard.  Members are engaged in various activities within the platform, which increases profile views and they are instantly rewarded by being included on this list.  This behavior also leads members to completing profile details.  Other less engaged members can review high count profiles for clues on improving their own profile and status.
  • Display a limited “profile recently viewed by” list in member’s profile. The limit works with time, while the list surfaces activity.  This encourages connections.  Members studying other members are rewarded by being included on this list.
  • Display “recent activity stream with dates” in member’s profile.  This encourages activity across the platform.  Active members are rewarded with full activity streams within a window of time.  This also helps other members discover information and connect with others.
  • Add two “int fields” to store the profile point counts. Members should be awarded virtual cash for increasing the value of the Enterprise 2.0 Platform.  One field stores the grand total.  The other can be reset at will by the platform managers to support metrics in windows of time, which can be used for contests.  Members earn virtual cash by completing activities on the platform.  The algorithm for activity value is set by the platform managers.  Activity value is determined by the goals and purpose of the platform.  A simple activity value algorithm could look like this: login=100, login before noon=500, page views=100, rate an item=250, create an article=5,000, create two article in one day=10,000 + bonus 5,000, upload an item=2,000, add a comment=1,000, viewing a profile=500, your article viewed = 100, member rates your article=500, member comments on your article=1,000,… The value of the activity should relate to the member’s effort and value added to the platform’s community.  Members can choose to spend their virtual cash on drawings for real world prizes.  You can also feature their story on the platform, they can write about the benefits of the platform.

These are just a few ideas on adding that “addictive property” to an Enterprise 2.0 Platform.  These simple ideas will also help platform managers identify key players to consult with on future updates.  Remember rewards don’t always need to be cash, just take a look at FourSquare

Game Theory Resources

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is a theory in psychology, proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper A Theory of Human Motivation.  Most of these needs are met by popular games and should be supported in Enterprise 2.0 platforms to ensure rapid adoption and success.

Maslows-Hierarchy-of-Needs

Mind-Blowing Thoughts on Games by Jesse Schell

Carnegie Mellon University Professor, Jesse Schell, dives into a world of game development which will emerge from the popular “Facebook Games” era.

Example of changing behavior by design

Do you doubt human behavior can change by design?  You may want to take a look at the video: Piano stairs – TheFunTheory.com They believe that the easiest way to change people’s behavior for the better is by making it fun to do.  This is a FUNdamental understanding behind game theory, “FUN”.

The Future of Content Platforms

Capture, Manage, Deliver, & Preserve Content

“Enterprise 2.0 is the use of emergent social software platforms within companies, or between companies and their partners or customers.” ~Andrew McAfee, Harvard Business School.  Stephane Croisier put together his thoughts and visuals on this topic in “Future of Content Platforms“.  Here is a nice look at using #LinkedData to surface “Collective Intelligence”. I also enjoyed seeing the inclusion of “Mashability” and Mashups starting on slide 28.