Tag Archives: Innovation

Humanize the Enterprise for Innovation

HUMANIZE THE ENTERPRISE

Harnessing the Power of Engagement to Drive Innovation

The negative impact of the global economy has created barriers that prevent organizations and individuals from realizing their maximum potential.  Today’s business leaders are required to do more with less, a lot less.  Reducing costs and increasing productivity take top priority during these difficult times.  Innovative thought leaders are optimizing all business assets to remain competitive.

The most important asset to any organization is the people.  These people include employees, partners, and customers.  Organizations that survive the current transition phase and thrive in the future are the ones that harness the power of engagement. Continue reading

The Social Business of Enterprise Gamification

Social Business Gamification

Unlocking New Levels of Innovation through Collaboration


Enterprise Gamification is the use of game dynamics within organizations to support a collaborative culture that aligns with business objectives.  This creates an agile social business model that can increase chances of success in current competitive markets and future markets.  Applying Enterprise Gamification and implementing game mechanics in enterprise 2.0 platforms plays a very important role in it’s event-driven architecture for capturing the REAL value of enterprise 2.o solutions.  This REAL value is realized by lowering barriers of participation and showing the relationships of people, ideas, and things.  Implementing enterprise gamification strategy should be a part of the complete social business strategy.  Learn more at “The Secret Social Science Sauce of Gamification“.

Demystifying Enterprise Gamification for Business

Gamification describes a series of design principles, processes and systems used to influence, engage and motivate individuals, groups and communities to drive behaviors and effect desired outcomes. Continue reading

Purpose Driven Social Business

The Power of Organizational Purpose

Accelerating Innovation with Engaged Employees

Would you use this device for listening or speaking?

Organizations that harness the power of “Social Business” with engaged employees driven to add value to their market will increase their levels of success moving into the future.

During one of OpenText’s Exploring Organizational Purpose events, I had an opportunity to talk with Scott from OpenText about real innovation in the Enterprise.  I don’t have the authorization to write about all of his amazing thoughts, however, I can summarize it in one word.  The single word that summarizes real innovation in the Enterprise is, “Connected“.

Breakfast with Michael Edson

Michael Edson ( @mpedson ) gave an entertaining and intelligent presentation at the Exploring Organizational Purpose #purposeBiz event in Washington, DC.  Michael is a living example of “passion with purpose”.  He shared his ideas about the “power of now” and how to fan the flames of passion in organizations to fuel real innovation.

His presentation along with additional text and links is available here.

Michael also shared additional thoughts about “Crowd Accelerated Innovation” and Openess here.

Marisa Peacock (@marisacp51) wrote about this event in her article, “Going Boldly Into the Present with Michael Edson“.

Breakfast with John Seely Brown

John Seely Brown ( @jseelybrown ) is Co-Director of Deloitte’s Center for the Edge. His research and insight into how we as a society are learning to live in an age of constant flux is masterfully structured and presented. [more]

I am a huge fan of John Seely Brown’s work and believe you will discover many tips and ideas you can apply to your organization in this video, “Collaborative Innovation by John Seely Brown“.

The hotel where this event was hosted had internet issues, but John’s video should be available soon. In the meantime you can see John sharing how tech is changing education and society in this video.

Breakfast with Andrew McAfee

Andrew McAfee ( @amcafee ) coined the Term Enterprise 2.0 five years ago. Since then, he has researched, written and reported widely on the capacity of individuals and teams, the types of problems collaboration can solve.  This event scheduled for November 1, 2011 will sell out fast, so RSVP now.

What If?

These events sponsored by OpenText show us the future of Social Business.  Organizations that seek to deeply engage with their community will emerge as leaders in their field.

What if every organization offered events where people can connect and share ideas?

This could unlock real innovation to solve problems in our everyday lives.

Current Social Business Innovation Twitter Game Board

Diversity fuels innovation. Sports fanatics have their fantasy football teams. This is my fantasy innovation team. This Social Business Innovation twitter game board represents people focused on Innovation in Enterprise 2.0 and Social Business now.

[twitterusers @mpedson @deb_lavoy @jseelybrown @mixtmedia @amcafee @bhc3 @lovisatalk @jimworth @dhinchcliffe]

Healthy Behaviors with Gamification of Health

Gamification for Healthy Behaviors

“It’s not the technology, it’s the psychology”

Anyone that has ever been on a diet or has worked on creating healthy lifestyle habits can tell you that changing behavior is not easy. The path to success usually involves positive reinforcement from within and others. Negative behaviors from within or others can easily keep us from achieving our goals. This human behavior also applies to “Motivational Design”, as in the use of “Gamification” to help guide players through desired behaviors to achieve goals.

sunrise over water

It’s not the technology, it’s the psychology

Innovation Gamification

Gamification combined with Design Thinking can help us think differently about innovation. Leveraging this process with Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) provides new levels of engagement for supporting desired behaviors. The seven phases of design thinking and a video about teaching design thinking through gamification are available here, “Design Thinking Gamification for Accelerating Innovation“.

Beyond Gamification of Healthy Behaviors

Gartner predicts that by 2015, more than 50% of organizations that manage innovation processes will Gamify those processes, “The Gamification of Innovation in the Enterprise“. Gartner also added Gamification in their 2011 Technology Hype Cycle report. Gamification does have a lot of hype, but can also be used for good.

Robert Scoble recorded an amazing interview with keasAdam Bosworth that goes beyond Gamification for healthy behaviors. Adam candidly talks about the jagged rocks of failure scattered along the curves on the road to success. He also mentions numerous stats and facts, this within itself shows the value of understanding your audience and measuring what is important. There are a LIFETIME of lessons packed in this 41 minute video.

Quick Quotes

  • “Never start a web project as a platform problem”
  • “What are we really trying to do?”
  • “It’s not the technology, it’s the psychology”

Powerful Persuasive Points

  1. Help Solve Real Problems
  2. Positive Reinforcement is Powerful
  3. Make. Measure. Modify.
  4. Surface Specific Steps
  5. Think People Over Technology
  6. Seek First to Understand
  7. Practice Persuasive Design
  8. Group Size Affects Engagement
  9. ???

How Gamification of Health Works

The “Power of Play” guides behavior and changes attitudes about goals. See how keas works and why gamification of health is important in this video.

 

Twitter Gamification Gameboard

Gamification and the art of Motivational Design are complex topics, but there are many smart people and organizations willing to help. Here are several people and organizations on Twitter that are focused on Gamification, Game Mechanics, and Game Theory for engagement on this Twitter Gamification Gameboard. People can also connect with others by following this Gamification Twitter List.
[twitterusers @marigo @Seriosity @mbjorn @gzicherm @dingstweets @amyjokim @mich8elwu @mmartoccia @GrahamHill]

Creating Persuasive Experiences

Adam Bosworth talks about creating persuasive technology during the process of creating keas in his video interview. Persuasive Technology is broadly defined as technology that is designed to change attitudes or behaviors of the users through persuasion and social influence, but not through coercion (Fogg 2002). Such technologies are regularly used in sales, diplomacy, politics, religion, military training, public health, and management, and may potentially be used in any area of human-human or human-computer interaction.

Here are a few resources for developing a strategy on creating persuasive experiences.

Stanford Persuasive Tech Lab: By empowering millions of people to create persuasive experiences with technology, we will have thousands, and perhaps millions, of forces working toward the better in the world.

Stanford Behavior Design: The best design solutions today change human behavior. Yet despite decades of research, challenges remain for people who design to influence. First, “persuasion” seems a dirty word. It shouldn’t be. We should now embrace that we’re in the business of behavior change. Next problem: conceptual confusion. The landscape of persuasion can be disorienting, muddied by impractical theories and over-hyped techniques. Our new work provides a clear view of behavior change, including language that is simple yet accurate.

Stanford Game Theory: Game theory is the study of the ways in which strategic interactions among economic agents produce outcomes with respect to the preferences (or utilities) of those agents, where the outcomes in question might have been intended by none of the agents.

The Gamification Summit NYC is the must-attend event that shows you how to use the power of games to create breakthrough engagement with your customers and employees. Companies like Gilt Groupe, Google, Microsoft, NBC/Universal, MTV, Recyclebank and Aetna have leveraged gamification to transform their businesses, and will share startling insights, statistics and hands-on workshops at GSummit NYC.

Design Thinking Gamification for Accelerating Innovation

The Game has Changed

Are REAL Players Thinking Differently?

While visiting several Smithsonian museums in Washington DC, I was awestruck by this Nation of Innovation.  Extraordinary innovations from seemingly ordinary people.  These great innovators (creators of print, electricity, human flight, …) are actually very similar to people we see everyday.  So, what makes a great innovator?  Were these innovative players design thinkers?  Did they accomplish these great achievements by leveraging science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), core technological underpinnings of an advanced society, and apply Social and Emotional Learning (SEL)?

Design Thinking

Unlike analytical thinking, design thinking is a creative process based around the “building up” of ideas. There are no judgments early on in design thinking. This eliminates the fear of failure and encourages maximum input and participation in the ideation and prototype phases. Outside the box thinking is encouraged in these earlier processes since this can often lead to creative solutions.  An example of a design thinking process could have seven stages: define, research, ideate, prototype, choose, implement, and learn. Within these seven steps, problems can be framed, the right questions can be asked, more ideas can be created, and the best answers can be chosen. The steps aren’t linear; they can occur simultaneously and can be repeated.

Teaching design thinking through gamification

Design Ethnography is  a discipline which teaches you how to observe what people do in order to identify hidden needs for which you can design new solutions. It’s one of a group of skills that have never been part of the early educational curriculum before. Recent experiments in imparting these skills using “game dynamics” show that it’s astonishingly easy to quickly turn places where learning motivation is often almost unattainable into a hive of surprisingly self-motivated promising design-thinking innovators.

Mickey McManus is president, CEO, and principal of MAYA Design, Inc.  He shares examples of STEM SEL Design Thinking in the video.

5 Discovery Skills of Great Innovators

So what makes innovators different from the rest of us?  Innovators engage the following behavioral skills more frequently:

  1. Connecting. Innovators connect fields, problems, or ideas that others find unrelated
  2. Questioning. Innovators are consummate questioners who show a passion for inquiry.
  3. Observing. Innovators are also intense observers.
  4. Networking. Innovators spend a lot of time and energy finding and testing ideas through a diverse network of individuals who vary wildly in their backgrounds and perspectives.
  5. Experimenting. Finally, innovators are constantly trying out new experiences and piloting new ideas.

8 Pillars of Innovation

Google’s Susan Wojcicki says the key to innovation is, “Nurturing a culture that allows for innovation”.  She went on to share these foundational 8 Pillars of Innovation.

  1. Have a Mission that­ Matters
  2. Think Big but Start Small
  3. Strive for Continual Innovation, not Instant Perfection
  4. Look for Ideas Everywhere
  5. Share Everything
  6. Spark with Imagination, Fuel with Data
  7. Be a Platform
  8. Never Fail to Fail

What if Problem Solving was Fun?

The Gamification of World Peace

Most people think their problems are a world crisis.  What if solving real problems was fun?  John Hunter shares his experience of the world peace game in this enlightening video.

Tools and Resources

Social Innovation Toolkit

The Innovator’s Toolkit provides system-level change strategies, tips and tools culled from the experience of innovators driving change in communities across the country.  The Innovator’s Toolkit is also based on a framework for advancing innovation.

Mozilla Open Badges Project

Today’s learning happens everywhere, not just in the classroom. But it’s often difficult to get credit for it.  Mozilla and Peer 2 Peer University are working to solve this problem by developing an Open Badges infrastructure.  Learn more here.