The Enterprise 2.0 Features for Enterprise 3.0 Benefits Driving Social Business

Strategies for Social Business

Supporting Social Business Enterprises

Something different happened at the 2011 Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Boston.  Something that goes beyond the Enterprise 2.0 Community.  A paradigm shift that affects all people.

Employers will no longer be hiring employees, they will be hiring a Workforce of Networked Workers.  Employers will embrace the “Innovation Age” with employees leveraging their networks to tap the exponential value in co-creation.  These new Social Business Models will generate the business intelligence required to succeed  in competitive markets.  Its hard to believe Enterprise 2.0 is only a few years old, but eventually there will be no Enterprise 2.0.

The term “Enterprise 2.0″ is relatively young, Andrew McAfee used this label in his “Enterprise 2.0: The Dawn of Emergent Collaboration” article written for “MITSloan Management Review” in 2006.  This article explored the possibilities of using “Social Web” technologies in the Enterprise.  I met Andy shortly after this article was published and discovered he had many more ideas on this topic.  We talked about the challenges ahead, mostly workforce cultures and business leaders’ perception of “Social” technologies.  It is amazing how much has been accomplished in so little time!

Sociocultural Evolution in Social Business

The sociocultural evolution in Social Business supporting the transformation of collaboration with the process of co-creation for reducing the complexity of innovation.  A quick timeline that starts with Mainframes and Dumb Terminals shows an accelerated growth pattern.

Mainframes and Dumb Terminals

A few years ago, a time most young people consider the “Stone Age”, Mainframes and Dumb Terminals (green screens of text) were all the rage in the Enterprise. These huge Mainframe computers were too expensive for most businesses at the time and had the computing power comparable to the iPhone of today.

Enterprise 1.o

August 6, 1991 marked the debut of the Web as a publicly available service on the Internet.  Business owners saw the value in web-based applications and invested in this technology.  Businesses eventually moved past creating static brochure web sites about their business and started creating web-based business applications.

Enterprise 2.0

  • 2006: Andrew McAfee publishes “Enterprise 2.0: The Dawn of Emergent Collaboration”.
  • 2006 – 2009: Business teams implement blogs, wikis, & copy features from social networking sites.  The phrase, “Enterprise 2.0 is like Facebook behind the firewall” was the non-helpful marketing buzz.  The misguided had the mentality of,  “build it and they will collaborate”.  Thought leaders were busy collaborating with others and building platforms.  Everyone was focused on tearing down, destroying, and blowing up “silos”.
  • 2010: “Enterprise 2.0″ transforms to “Social Business”
  • 2009 – 2011: Focus starts to shift from “user generated content” to Collective Intelligence
  • 2011: More Enterprise 2.0 conversations about Open Social, Social Graph, XFN. FOAF, and APIs (see “Top 10 Reasons NOT to Use WOA & APIs in the Enterprise“).

Enterprise 3.0

Cultivating Network Effects: If Enterprise 2.0 is a play on Web 2.0, then Enterprise 3.0 is Semantic Social Business (Semantic Web).  This is where things really get interesting.  The future of searching for things in the Enterprise will be more about things finding you.  Collective Business Intelligence takes center stage.  More time is invested into social graph engines and algorithms. This is where some business IT money shifts to social science investments.

Andrew McAfee at Enterprise 2.0 Conf Boston 2011

Anyone involved with Enterprise 2.0 or Business Innovation should watch Andy’s video E 2.0 Boston 2011 presentation. You can also find it after logging into the E 2.0 Conference web site here. His topics include Wisdom of Crowds, Collective Intelligence, Prediction Markets, and more. He covers a lot of valuable information in a short period of time, so you may need to watch it a few times and take notes.  Here are 3 quick notes:

  • Give Community Members a voice
  • Let Computers do what they are designed to do
  • Let People do what they are designed to do

If you liked Andy’s presentation at the E 2.0 Conference Boston 2011, then you may like this video of him talking about most of the same topics.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAMCy9SnNM4

Gamification in the Enterprise?

About 4 minutes into Andy’s presentation at Boston’s Enterprise 2.0 Conference, he mentions “Gamification“.  Social Business Gamification is a very interesting topic.  Examples of how this works are everywhere, we can see how this looks in the employee review process in Rypple’s  video.  We can also learn more from Spigit, Bunchball, and Badgeville.  The AppFusions Team can integrate custom Gamification solutions for your business needs.

People at the Enterprise 2.0 Conference Boston 2011 seemed to appreciate Michael Wu’s session about Big Data Analytics for Social Media, but he has also put a lot of thought into how the Future of Enterprise Software will be Fun and Productive.  I wrote about his work in this article, “The Secret Social Science Sauce of Gamification“.

I believe many members of the Enterprise 2.o Community can benefit from his work.  I hope people encourage him ( @mich8elwu ) to give a keynote at The Enterprise 2.0 2011 Santa Clara Conference scheduled for November 14 – 17.

Resources:

There are so many great people willing to help others with Social Business and Enterprise 2.0 all over the web and in your neighborhood.  It is almost impossible to mention all of them here.  I recommend reviewing all the shared resources at http://www.e2conf.com and attending one of their events.  You will meet great people and learn fascinating things.

Jim Worth @jimworth did an Outstanding job of putting a huge collection of Enterprise 2.o resources here.

I wrote this article because I like what the Enterprise 2.0 Community is doing.  If you like this article or if you believe education for children is important, then please leave a comment on this blog about our brothers and sisters from the Washington DC area helping the children, teachers, and staff at Humble School Uganda Africa. http://humble-school.blogspot.com They will appreciate knowing somebody is thinking about them and wishing them well.

 

 

 

Social Business Communities of Engagement

Engagement: The Foundation of Social Business

Co-creation Fuels Innovation in Social Business

The explosion of Social Media and the rapid growth of new Social Business Models are driving intense focus on community development and collaboration to fuel innovation in the co-creation of our future.

“The best way to predict the future, is to create it together.”

In a previous article we reviewed “7 Key Success Factors of Sustainable Social Business“.  Relationships play a key role in any business and in life itself.  Developing and supporting healthy relationships is the foundation of Social Business.  A complete guide to healthy communities  is available from The Open Source Way,  “Creating and nurturing communities of contributors“.  Here are the 7 principals for cultivating  communities for positive engagement.  Thanks to Michael J Ricard (@mijori23) for bringing this to my attention on Twitter today.

7 Principals for Cultivating Engaged Communities

1. Design for Evolution

When starting a new community effort, it’s difficult to know what form it will take. Volunteers are not employees; they can only be influenced, never ordered. Some may take passionately to the proposed project; others may only be able to give some of their time. [evolution]

2. Open a Dialogue Between Inside and Outside Perspectives

In any community there are always “insiders” — i.e., the people who understand the problem space very well, the people who are at the core of the domain space — and people who are “outsiders”, but have enthusiasm, some domain knowledge, and a willingness to help. A successful community uses both of these perspectives effectively, because it’s the outsiders who are most likely to impart new energy and new perspectives.  [dialogue]

3. Invite Different Levels of Participation

In a volunteer community especially, people who join are going to be invested in learning more and doing more, and it’s important to identify work that matches the newbie’s skills, invites them to stretch those skills, and provides people who can help them develop those skills as required. [participation]

4. Develop Both Public and Private Community Spaces

Avoiding the cabal mentality does not mean having every single conversation in public, ever. Transparency is great, but it is unreasonable to expect everyone to be comfortable with full transparency, all the time.

Also, one-to-one communication builds intimacy and trust that multiway communication cannot. Especially as new participants are building confidence, it’s vitally important to build private relationships between individuals. Certainly it is appropriate to encourage important conversations to be moved into public forums, especially conversations about actions that will affect others. But private chats are important too, and often useful for eliciting insights that help move the more public conversations forward. [spaces]

5. Focus on Value

No volunteer wants to spend time on work that nobody values. Therefore, encourage community members to express the value that they receive from the community, and to reflect on the value that they provide.

Also understand that not everyone’s notion of value needs to agree; so long as participants do not actually detract by participating, they should feel free to add value in whatever way they see fit. Core participants frequently do not value a set of contributions initially, and only come to understand and appreciate that value later. Even contributions that are wildly experimental and far from the mainstream, and may not seem at all valuable, should be respected and encouraged. [value]

6. Combine Familiarity and Excitement

Stable and familiar working processes are vital, because people need tasks to focus their day-to-day work.

Still, people can not thrive on heads-down tasks alone. Exciting new challenges create opportunities to energize old friends and attract new ones, and give volunteers an important sense that they are all wrapped up in a great and important challenge. This excitement is crucially important to keep volunteers motivated on the daily work. [excitement]

7. Create a Rhythm for the Community

The pace of engagement is crucially important in a community of doers.

Moving too quickly and demanding too much, too soon, can leave volunteers frantic and feeling like they can’t keep up. Moving too slowly can lose volunteers who do not see enough activity to hold their own interest. [rhythm]

Community Development Guide

The complete community development guide helps people understand how to and how not to engage with community over projects such as software, content, marketing, art, infrastructure, standards, and so forth. It contains knowledge distilled from years of Red Hat experience.

Principles for Cultivating Communities of Practice

In his book Cultivating Communities of Practice, Etienne Wenger proposes seven principles for successfully cultivating communities of practice. Anyone who is responsible for moving a community forward towards its goals should consider reading it.

Enterprise Gamification for Leveling Up to Prediction Markets by Powering Up with Collective Intelligence

Enterprise Gamification Strategy

Enterprise Gamification is the use of game mechanics within organizations to support a collaborative culture that aligns with business objectives to create an agile social business model that can increase chances of success in current competitive markets and future markets.  Applying the principals of game theory and implementing game mechanics in enterprise 2.0 platforms plays a very important role in it’s event-driven architecture for capturing the REAL value of enterprise 2.o solutions.  This REAL value is realized by lowering barriers of participation and showing the relationships of people, ideas, and things.  Implementing enterprise gamification strategy should be a part of the complete social business strategy.  Additional information is available in this article, “The Gamification of Innovation in the Enterprise“.

The Exponential Value of Social Business

What is the difference between Social Business and Enterprise 2.0?

The term “Social Business” gained wide-spread popularity at the 2010 Enterprise 2.0 Conference.  Andrew McAfee ( @amcafee ) shares his valid thoughts on this trend in “‘Social Business’ is Past Retirement Age“.  Stowe Boyd ( @stoweboyd ), another well-respected player in the Enterprise 2.0 Industry, shares his thoughts on this trend in “Andrew McAfee on ‘Social Business’ versus ‘Enterprise 2.0′, One More Time“.  Using a label / hashtag ( #e2conf or #e20 ) makes discovering related information easy.  Using “labels/terms” also helps focus context of conversation.  “Enterprise 2.0″ has revived SOA, SaaS, PaaS, …., but I believe the specific term still depends on the context of the conversation.

This controversy over terms also applies to “#Gamification“.  The terms “Gamification” or “Gamify” may seem “buzz busy” and out of place in the context of business, but these terms actually help business leaders connect to new ideas for accomplishing business goals.  You can learn more about how to use game mechanics to accomplish your goals at this Gamification Workshop by Gabe Zichermann ( @gzicherm ) scheduled for June 23 in Washington, DC (check the schedule for a location near you).

The foundation of harnessing the power of the web for Social Business leads us back to “Web 2.0: A Strategy Guide” By Amy Shuen.  Videos on this guide by Amy Shuen are available at “‘Web 2.0: A Strategy Guide'” By Amy Shuen“.

Unlocking the Deeper Levels of Value in Enterprise 2.0 Platforms

Combining Enterprise Architecture (EA) with Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Event-Driven Architecture (EDA) provides methods for capturing and surfacing the power of collective intelligence.  This architecture strategy for Business Intelligence (BI) leverages previously unknown causal relationships to form a new event pattern.  This new business intelligence pattern triggers further autonomous human or automated processing that adds exponential value to the enterprise by injecting value-added information into the recognized pattern which could not have been achieved previously.  I have shared ideas on this topic before at “Enterprise 2.0 Adoption Patterns: Collective Intelligence“.

Collective Intelligence

The main concept to grasp about collective intelligence in the enterprise is this:

The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.”  ~Aristotle

Prediction Markets

Harnessing the power of collective intelligence to unlock the hidden levels of prediction markets can be accomplished by surfacing data through interactive widgets, gadgets, and apps.  Data analysis can be difficult and time consuming, but crowdsourcing these tasks out to the players of your business community can lighten the burden and achieve better results.  These interactive apps can be created by mashing up data with chart/graph APIs and game components into web-based widgets.  Using standard methods for creating these widgets will support sharing the experience across the enterprise in a platform independent manner.

How Do We Get There From Here?

The challenge of successfully unlocking these hidden secret levels of value will require a collaborative effort.  Here are a few resources for helping your team on this quest.

BUNCHBaLL Gamification Whitepaper

“Gamification uses proven techniques from game design to satisfy your customers and engage them with your content, community or brand, while simultaneously driving meaningful value for your business.” ~ BUNCHBaLLGamification Whitepaper

Badgeville – Gamification Report

“Badgeville is a white label Social Rewards & Analytics Platform for web and mobile publishers. Our customers come from a wide variety of verticals including retail, entertainment, publishing, education, enterprise and more.” ~Badgeville – Gamification Report

APIs, Apps, Widgets, & Gadgets

Wisdom of the (developer) crowd: Key lessons on using APIs

“… We’re talking specifically about “open” (or public) APIs, those that are intended to be picked up and used by outside developers. This is common practice in the tech industry, where Facebook, Twitter, Google, and more offer APIs that let developers build applications around their data… ”

PhD Thesis on Mashups

Michele Stecca (@steccami ), Convergent Composition of Telecom and Internet Services in Telco/IT Mashups, PhD Thesis, University of Genoa, 2011

Pro Web Gadgets

“Pro Web Gadgets” by Sterling Udell was published before its time.  This book about “Cross-platform Development Strategies” goes far beyond how to use clever Web 2.0 technologies for creating apps, widgets, and gadgets for the “Distributed Web”.  The author carefully guides the reader through the techniques and strategy of extending existing IT investments to make data more interesting and sharable across environments and devices.  The purchase of this book is a priceless investment for anyone thinking about developing for the future of the web.

Developing Web Widgets with HTML, CSS, JSON and AJAX by Rajesh Lal is also a good book, but I like it for different reasons and plan share some thoughts on it soon too.


Enterprise Gamification is a huge topic with many areas to explore.  You can discover more here “Enterprise Gamification”  I have also discovered a lot of very smart helpful people about this topic on Twitter.  You can follow this #Gamification Twitter List to connect with people that can help you on this adventure.  You can discover intelligent people sharing ideas about Enterprise 2.0 & Social Business on this “Enterprise 2.0 Twitter List #e20“.

The Enterprise 2.0 Strategy of Gamification

Improving Enterprise 2.0 Adoption Through Gamification

A Gamification Strategy will Continue to Support Perpetual User Engagement

gamification-summit

The Gamification Summit 2011 created a bit of buzz in Enterprise 2.0 circles this week.  This buzz included this great article Trends: 5 Engagement Factors For Gamification And The Enterprise by R Ray Wang, you can connect with him on Twitter at @rwang0

Did you know that Call of Duty: Black Ops generated more than $360 Million Dollars in the first day of sales? Call of Duty: Black Ops is the most beautifully intelligent game I have ever played!  This masterpiece offers amazing game play, stunning graphics, awards, badges, achievements, customization, and takes game mechanics to a whole new level.  Let’s take a look at how we can leverage these success factors for the Enterprise, but first take a look at this funny Call of Duty: Block Ops video.

Call of Duty: Black Ops TV Commercial: “There’s A Soldier In All Of Us”

What is Gamification?

Gamification is the use of game play mechanics for non-game applications, in order to encourage people to adopt the applications. It also strives to encourage users to engage in desired behaviors in connection with the applications.  You can learn more on the Gamification Blog.

How Does Gamification Apply to Enterprise 2.0?

Maslows-Hierarchy-of-Needs

Gamification in Enterprise 2.0 is about Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, a theory in psychology, proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper A Theory of Human Motivation.  Most of these needs are met by popular games and should be supported in Enterprise 2.0 platforms to ensure rapid adoption and success.  You will discover some simple methods to “Gamify” your Enterprise 2.0 Platform in this article I wrote last year Game Theory for Enterprise 2.0 Adoption.  That article also includes a few videos about human behavior.  Ideas around the bigger picture of using game mechanics in the Enterprise is coverd in this article Enterprise 2.0 Adoption Patterns: Collective Intelligence.

Gamification Videos & Presentations

The gamification presentations from the Gamification Summit are available to members, but here are a few presentations that will get you thinking differently about using game mechanics in your Enterprise 2.0 Platform to improve user engagement.

Gamification Patterns & Pitfalls

Gabe Zichermann, Gamification Expert and Author discusses some of the main ways that gamification will change your business in this video.

Gamification by Scott Dodson COO, Bobber Interactive

Gamification-by-Scott-Dodson

Gamification by Wanda Meloni, M2 Research

Gamification-by-Wanda-Meloni

Gamification and Its Discontents by Sebastian Deterding

gamification-discontents-Sebastian-Deterding

Engagement through Gamification

Engagement-through-Gamification