Enterprise 2.0 & The Future of Work

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Enterprise 2.0 Adoption

We seem to spend a lot of time and money on learning to understand Enterprise 2.0 Adoption Patterns to help make things easier and more intuitive for employees.  It’s great when the strategy behind an Enterprise 2.0 Solution includes design and development elements that help employees connect to things and each other.  These elements should have the employee feeling like the system can read their mind.  This type of platform behavior does require a little effort.  We already see these type of platform behaviors in the public space, in places like Amazon, eHarmony,  and NetFlix.  The connection and recommendation engines behind these sites contribute heavily to their success. There are teams of great people helping organizations with Enterprise 2.0 Adoption, including The 2.0 Adoption Council.  You can meet some of these members and other amazing people smart about Enterprise 2.0 at the Enterprise 2.0 Conference.

Why should I Learn How to Use Social Networking Tools?

Social Networking Tools will be the common form of communication in the future work place. People should learn how to use these tools now to avoid displacement in the workforce of the very near future.  Enterprise 2.0 Adoption Council members spend a lot of their nights and weekends helping organizations secure their future.  It’s end-user’s responsibility to learn how to effectively use these Enterprise 2.0 tools to secure their personal future.  I recommend reaching out to colleagues and the members of the 2.0 Adoption Council for additional assistance.

There are a couple videos below that can help you understand “The Future of Work“.

The Future of Work by Ross Dawson

In a global connected economy we must become more and more specialized, otherwise our work become commoditized. However specialists must collaborate closely with others in order to create value.” ~ Ross Dawson, author of Implementing Enterprise 2.0, A Practical Guide To Creating Business Value Inside Organizations With Web Technologies.  You can learn more about The future of work by Ross Dawson here.

The Future of Work by Thomas W. Malone

In Thomas Malone’s optimistic view of the future, the human values of creativity and freedom ultimately triumph, and business leads the way. This explosion of possibilities in work, and everyday life, will flow from the increasing ease and decreasing expense of communicating.

Malone sees parallels between the emergence of democracies in political and business worlds, and technological advances in communications. He notes that in the age of the Internet, businesses are growing decentralized, markedly departing from “command and control” organizational models to newer environments where “workers seek advice instead of approval.”

Empowered by new technologies, workers will exercise ever greater strength in important decisions — even while corporations expand and sprawl across borders. Just as the printing press enabled large numbers of people to participate in the politics of their times, so will the Internet and evolving communications technologies enable workers to perform their jobs as more active decision-makers, across greater distances.

For evidence of this massive shift, Malone explores the “e-lance” economy, as well as the success of eBay, a company with 130,000-plus off site “sellers” making up a global network of “small store owners.”  You can learn more about The future of work by Thomas Malone here.

The Future of Your Career by You

I have not been able to find any information that reports how learning to use Enterprise 2.0 Tools can harm you or your career. I recommend experimenting with your communication skill by using these social networking tools. Please share your experience with colleagues. You may want them in your future workplace.

What do you think about the “Future of Work”?

4 thoughts on “Enterprise 2.0 & The Future of Work”

  1. Pingback: IntranetLounge
  2. To my mind, Ross Dawson has it entirely backwards about specialists versus generalists. Unless the work is so specialised that it is likely to be bypassed anyway, specialists can often be replaced, by other people, and often by computers. But good generalists who can understand the connections between specialisms and systems, and can place them within a cultural context, will be *very* hard to replace.

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